QUATRAIN

(KWOT-rain)

 

Lesson 22

 

HEY!! Does anybody have a quarter? What's a quarter have to do with this type of poetry? Well, a quarter is 1/4 of a dollar. The word quatrain comes from Latin and French words meaning "four." See the connection? The quatrain is a poem or stanza of four lines. It is a very popular form of poetry. Famous poets like William Blake and T. S. Eliot used quatrains. Read these examples:

 

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

In the forests of the night,

What immortal hand or eye

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

 

-From William Blake's "The Tyger"

 

 

The Mountain

Donna Brock

 

The mountain frames the sky (a)

As a shadow of an eagle flies by. (a)

With clouds hanging at its edge (b)

A climber proves his courage on its rocky ledge. (b)

 

Did you notice that a quatrain is formed by two rhyming couplets? Easy! This pattern is called a a b b. The first line rhymes with the second (sky and by) and the third line rhymes with the fourth line (edge and ledge). Other quatrain patterns are a b a b,

a b b a, and a b c b.

 

Lyrical Lesson: Quatrain

1. Choose a theme that you recently heard in a song.

2. Brainstorm ideas for purpose and mood.

3. Add descriptive words and phrases (This would be a GREAT time to use

figurative language!).

4. Write two joining couplets that "paint" a complete word picture. Proofread.

Revise.

5. Design an album cover that would best illustrate the theme of your quatrain.

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