Building Bridges
An Internet WebQuest on The Study of Bridges

Main Page


Picture Courtesy of San Francisco, copyright, 1997

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Main Page | Teaching Page | Student Page | Roles & Resources | Bridge Collection |

This WebQuest challenges you to investigate bridge construction. It encourages you to understand the geometry and physical science involved. It promotes an appreciation of the complexity of such a commonplace structure, and it broadens knowledge of the career opportunities that is present in building bridges. It allows you to strengthen your technology skills, exercise your creativity, practice your research skills, and to tour real bridges. You will examine the kinds of bridges found in the world. You will research materials and methods being used. Finally you will demonstrate your new
knowledge and insight by designing your own bridge and then testing it for strength and integrity of structure. When you finish, you will be better informed about a structure that you have probably taken for granted. You will You will understand how this might be helpful to you in your lifetime.
You will then articulate the why and how of your bridge construction.

This is a motivational, fun, and enlightening WebQuest that provides students a hands-on opportunity while combining and practicing math, language, science, and social studies skills.  You might consider beginning with this lesson plan.  



Index of Bridge Construction Pages Within this WebQuest

 

Teacher Page

Student Page

Roles and Resources

 

Introduction

Content Areas and
Grades

The Quest

Curriculum
Standards

Process and Resources Needed

Evaluation &
Assessment

Introduction

The Quest

The Process and Resources
Background Information

Instructions

Presentation

Conclusion

Evaluation

Student Roles &
Descriptions

Bridge Resources and Links

Student Bridge Projects Display

Evaluation Rubric



This project was created by the Science Department at Harris Middle School.
It was designed as a project for sixth grade science students.