About Me

My goal is to do work that matters. I seek to create new knowledge by conducting research that leads to new discoveries about the social world, helping students develop curiosity about the dynamics of power in social and political life, and sharing insights from the social sciences with policymakers and the public in ways that generate deeper understanding and more informed policy choices. My research is fundamentally motivated by a desire to understand connections between citizens and government – how public policies and government actions affect the lives of people and how the governed influence the state. I am particularly interested in how socially and economically marginalized groups are affected by and influence the state. Much of my past research, as well as the projects I’m currently pursuing, focus specifically on questions related to economic, social, and political inequality in democratic political systems. The geographic context of my work has most often been the United States, but I am increasingly utilizing cross-national comparisons with a focus on Latin America. Methodologically, I emphasize quantitative methodologies supplemented by elite interviews, historical analysis, and other qualitative approaches as appropriate. I apply a variety of techniques in an effort to generate accurate and appropriately contextualized conclusions.

I am currently Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Tennessee. I have also been awarded an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship for my work on inequality and American democracy and have been hosted by the Russell Sage Foundation as a Visiting Scholar.

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Photo credit: Texture Photo

Research

Doing innovative, rigorous, and relevant analysis. My substantive interests include inequality and democratic politics, the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and Latin America, and representation of marginalized groups.

 

Teaching

Developing and delivering course content for graduate and undergraduate students connected to my expertise in American politics, political economy, inequality and democracy, political behavior, legislative institutions, public opinion, elections, and quantitative methodology.

Public Outreach

Working to connect scholars to policymakers, journalists, and civic organizations through my affiliation with the Scholars Strategy Network and by presenting my research to community groups and in other public forums.

Disciplinary Leadership

Supporting the social sciences by serving on editorial boards and review panels, actively participating in professional organizations, and organizing opportunities for intellectual exchange.

Mentoring

Helping graduate students and junior colleagues reach their full potential as scholars.

My Research

Quick Facts

Google Scholar Citations
1531
Publications
20
Students
1100
Grants and Awards
470919

Contact Me

Please use this form to get in touch with me. I would be delighted to discuss my work in more detail and answer any questions you might have. I am also happy to give research-based presentations to academic or public audiences. If you’d like for me to discuss economic inequality in the United States with your organization or group I am eager to hear from you. And if you’re a social scientist looking to fill spots in a speaker series, I am always eager to get feedback on my work from as broad a group of scholars as possible. I look forward to hearing from you!





Latest news

Talk at Columbia University Political Science Department

Next week I will be presenting work from my current book project. The talk, scheduled for Tuesday, November 14 at noon will be hosted by the Columbia University American politics speaker series. I will be discussing opinion and electoral responses to the ebb and flow of income inequality in the United States.

Talk at Columbia University Center for the Study of Wealth and Inequality

I will be at Columbia University today talking about a portion of my latest book project. The talk is titled ” The Inequality Reinforcing Effects of Status Quo Bias and Inegalitarian Policymaking.” I explore how U.S. policymaking institutions have responded to changes in national-level income inequality over the last 100 years.

Latest Contribution to Debate over Error Correction Models Published

In an ongoing exchange relating to the proper application of the General Error Correction Model in time series analysis, my co-authors and I argue that this model produces reasonable inferences so long as a straightforward set of procedures are carefully and correctly applied. The paper is open access and can be downloaded here. For our […]

More News

Connect with some of my co-authors

Organizations Supporting/Disseminating my Work